Danger Lurks in the Garden- A Cautionary Tale from Durham, NC

I was halfway through writing a very pleasant blog post about my latest trip to New Bedford, Massachusetts, home of daughter A and her soon to be husband N, when I was (purposefully) interrupted by a trip to my hometown of Durham, NC to visit my parents. It was a beautiful weekend, the temperature was cool, and I was actually able to do one of the best training runs for Mt. Baker that I’ve done in a while. Turns out running in 70 degrees and no humidity is a lot easier than running in mid 80s when the clouds are about to burst open.

I was so inspired by the spring weather that I felt compelled to start weeding in my parents’ front yard. That was Saturday. My father announced toward the end of my session he thought there was a lot of poison ivy there. I hadn’t seen any and shrugged it off (the fact I was using an old bag that had been filled with lime to store my weeds explained the burning sensation in my hands – or so I thought). (I have subsequently determined that poison sumac looks a heckuva lot like the vines I was pulling.)

The next day my flight left in early afternoon, but what better way to spend an hour than pulling a few more weeds, this time from the back yard. Oh, I haven’t mentioned I rarely wear gloves; they diminish the sensation of the good solid pull you get from bare handed gardening.

I was fine on the flight back to Orlando on Sunday, although I started to notice some itchy sensations. Fast forward to Thursday. I’ve lost several days of training. I’m covered with bumps, red blotches, watery blisters, and pretty much any time I think about any part of my body it starts to itch.

The good news is I discovered Teladoc. For five dollars and setting up an account they found my benefits information and I was on a video call with a “Florida board certified ER physician,” within 30 minutes. She took one look at my red face and almost swollen shut left eye and called in a prescription for what is apparently known as a “prednisone blister pack.” I’ve now taken 4 tablets with 2 left to go for the day. Wondering if this is supposed to make me Uber aggressive and I should be arguing with opposing counsel.

But seriously, a totally fabulous and efficient health care experience. But I suggest you avoid it by wearing gloves while gardening.

2 thoughts on “Danger Lurks in the Garden- A Cautionary Tale from Durham, NC

  1. Stephen Brown May 12, 2022 / 11:08 pm

    I told your story to my horticulture class tonight. Your pain was their pleasure as they laughed so hard.

    -Sent from my iPad ********************** Stephen C. Brown, Ph.D. Professor of Agricultural Extension District Agriculture Agent University of Alaska Fairbanks https://sites.google.com/a/alaska.edu/brown/ 907-355-0692 cell 🇺🇸 ***************************

    >

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Roz May 13, 2022 / 5:41 pm

    Jessica was always warning me inCt-lots of poison ivy in her woods & yard, I don’t think that I would recognize sumac though. Sorry for your adventure, & hope you are well by now.

    Liked by 2 people

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