Running – The World is Flat After All

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What's up; what's down
What’s up; what’s down

As I plowed uphill on the first half of Saturday’s seven miler, I reveled in the knowledge that the backside was going to be all down. I was running a new route – through “downtown” College Park, our area of town, all the way up Edgewater Drive, past the public high school, the Catholic high school, an abandoned juke box store (who has thought of those for a while?), a gun shop, a driftwood designer, and assorted and sundry other small establishments.

But after I turned around at the half way mark, to my utter horror, nothing but uphill faced me. I kept running along, confident that at some point I was bound to find the downward trajectory of the long hill I was sure I had climbed. But none was to be found, at least until I reached the very short half block leading down to our lake.

I’ve been punked like this before. Mt. Elbrus has a fake summit that after several hours of climbing looks like the real thing. And on the long slog down, the random metal structures that dot the slopes of Elbrus all resemble the barrel huts we were staying in. Not to mention our explorations of the buttes around Sedona, Arizona where I was convinced that each arch must have been the one that would lead us out of the vortex and to the parking lot that housed our rental car and escape to civilization.

I can’t risk thwarted expectations on the way up Cotopaxi, much less Chimborazo or whatever other mountains we end up climbing. They stop you in your tracks; they bring you down – figuratively, and in the case of climbing, literally. I just need take each step in the moment, so that when that summit finally appears, or the refuge hut out of the winds can be seen, it’s a wonderful surprise.

And maybe it’s not so bad not to have the downhill stretch. There’s either an optical illusion where long flat stretches ahead of you appear to rise up in a gentle swell – or, it could just be the fact the prescription in my sunglasses is wrong. But the real point is that maybe something that can feel so hard is really easier than you’re letting yourself believe. Maybe the world is flat after all.

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2 thoughts on “Running – The World is Flat After All

  1. pscapp May 31, 2015 / 10:32 am

    When I was a kid I walked 7 miles to school in the snow. It was uphill both ways and school hadn’t vene been invented yet.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Dennis Laughlin June 1, 2015 / 6:59 am

    I know a business consultant who advises clients to only look for what he calls “downhill runs”. Ones where conditions assist your efforts. I on the other hand have always advised clients to focus on the improvement of their value proposition. Few are blessed with vision to make decisions regarding geography or trends. Most of us know better from mediocre. Your run on “Mystery Hill” falls right in line with your trips up the stairs. I can’t wait to hear of your successful summit.

    Liked by 1 person

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